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EMF Dangers and Hybrid Cars

by Randall Neustaedter OMD

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You are already concerned about cell phone radiation and cell phone tower emissions of electromagnetic field (EMF) energy. The easy solution for cell phone exposure is to use the speaker on your phone or use an air tube headset that transmits the sound through a tube like a stethoscope rather than through an electronic signal over wires. Wired headsets will transmit the electronic signal and the EMF radiation directly into the ear. Similarly, Bluetooth remote devices will pick up the radiation from the phone and transmit it to your ear. Air tube headsets are easily obtained through Internet sites for $25-35.

Another source of exposure to EMF radiation is hybrid cars. If you are considering buying a hybrid, you may want to reconsider. Many drivers of hybrid cars report symptoms of sleepiness, headaches, and increased blood pressure related to driving their car. Some experts in radiation exposure have measured high levels of the EMF in the passenger seats of hybrid cars emitted from the battery and power cables. Car manufacturers deny these claims and the association of symptoms with EMF exposure, and they question the accuracy of testing devices. There is no government testing or standards of EMF exposure in hybrid cars. Tests of individual cars have shown an exposure level above 100 milligauss in hybrids compared to 1-2 milligauss in gas cars. An article in the New York Times recently brought the issue of hybrid cars and EMF exposure to a broader public, and various organizations, including the Union of Concerned Scientists, have stated their interest in further studies. In the meantime, although hybrid cars are good for the environment, they may cost you more than the gas you save, and they may contribute to health problems. Like any new technology, these potential problems tend to come to light after the product is widely used.

If you are shopping for a new car, you may want to wait on the electric versions until more research is done. And you could consider finding a retrofitted biodiesel car that uses vegetable/diesel fuel. However, none of the ecologically friendly solutions are perfect at this point. For example, there is concern about using up arable land to grow crops to support an increased usage of vegetable oil.

Here is the New York Times article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/27/automobiles/27EMF.html?_r=2&oref=slogin&oref=slogin

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